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It’s Part Deux: Four More Musical Questions – My Answers… And Your Answers

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In case you missed the first round…

… this is the part of the show where I ask four music-related questions.

Or, as Angela and Gabriella like to call it:
The Rollerboogie Interrogation!

I’ll give my answers – and then it’s your turn.

1:

The first album I ever bought for myself was Days of Future Passed by The Moody Blues, when I was in high school.

My brother Greg had gotten me completely hooked on them, but that was an album that he didn’t have. 

I remember the way it felt to hold the record in my hand, mesmerized by the fascinating artwork on the cover, and to play it for the first time, marveling at what I was hearing.

It was so exciting, I had to walk over to my friend Matt’s house and play it for him as well. Being willing to spend my own money to release sounds previously unheard and to say, “this is my music” was exhilarating. 

2.

The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill. This is a symptom of my sick mind, but I still occasionally find myself having imaginary arguments with people who wrote negative or indifferent thoughts about this album when Stereogum reviewer Tom Breihan covered “Doo Wop (That Thing)” in his The Number Ones column. 

Simply put, it remains one of the most powerful musical statements I’ve ever heard, and it still hits me like nothing else to this day. Go after it or dismiss it for any reason and know that it’s personal.

I am aware that this is not a logical response, but I can’t help it.

3.

Good Times, Bad Times by Led Zeppelin. Even the best hitters in major league baseball fail more than they succeed.

In a fantasy world where I could swing a bat without embarrassing myself, I would have my share of good times and bad times.

But one thing for sure is that with that song, I’d be stoked every time I came to the plate.

4.

My mother passed away in January of 2022. At one point when my siblings and I were taking turns being with her in those final days, my sister Elise played a song by the Avett Brothers called “No Hard Feelings.”

It was incredibly moving, as it beautifully captured the essence of my mother at the end of her time on earth. 

After the funeral, there was a short burial service at the cemetery, and the song was played at the very end. We gathered around the urn arm in arm and just wept together. 

It was such a powerful moment and a perfect way to honor her and to say goodbye. 

The floor is open!

What are your answers?

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rollerboogie

I'm obsessed with music. That's what brought me here. I do have other interests. I like ill-advised, low budget movies that shouldn't even be close to good, but are great, and cats too.

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ISurvivedPop
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February 12, 2024 5:58 am

In a summer that wasn’t already horrible enough for me, the DJs at a dance had the nerve to play the Glee version of “Can’t Fight This Feeling” instead of the original, which they did not have in their iTunes.I can’t name any, but I can name many that provoke the exact opposite reaction. Would rather not dwell further.”3’s and 7’s” by QOTSA, for Madden NFL 08-related reasons.Not a particularly important moment in my life, but one time I was in a Vons and they played these nine songs, ALL OF WHICH ARE BANGERS:”We’ll Be a Dream” by We the Kings and Demi Lovato”Singing in My Sleep” by Semisonic”The Only Exception” by Paramore”Hot in the City” by Billy Idol”Fine Line” by Paul McCartney”These Times” by SafetySuit”Dominoes” by Robbie Nevil”Try” by Nelly Furtado”Falling Slowly” by the Swell Season
Absolutely nuts that a chain grocery store would play all of these in a row.

Last edited 8 days ago by ISurvivedPop
ISurvivedPop
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February 12, 2024 8:23 am
Reply to  rollerboogie

At one point I wanted to learn them so I could sing them as a medley. The problem was that “Falling Slowly” clashed too hard with the others.

ISurvivedPop
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February 12, 2024 6:03 am

Hi, I think my comment was marked as spam!

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February 12, 2024 7:01 am
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All fixed!

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February 12, 2024 10:59 am
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To explain:

If a comment has more than four links, it gets held in a review queue. This is a policy to prevent malware – but please feel free to link whatever you like; I will get a bot notification message that it’s being held, and I’ll manually release the comment.

(I know – More than you all cared to know about what’s under the hood..)

Phylum of Alexandria
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February 12, 2024 8:16 am

I love this series, rb. Such a great way for us to get to know one another. Here are my answers.

1. High School Music Memory:

I was getting into music that was pretty psychedelic starting in 10th grade. Siouxsie and the Banshees, the Glove, Sgt Pepper. And I would think to myself, this has got to sound so cool while tripping!

So when I finally got some acid to try, I had all my trippiest records and CDs prepared for a night of bliss. But in fact, I hardly listened to any music at all during the night; we were just wandering around the house and our neighborhood. Still, there was one song that played in my head over and over on a loop: “Dancing With Myself.” And I kept thinking: “this is effing brilliant!”

(also: there’s a soundtrack for this era)

2. Music Guardian:

My first impulse was to say Pere Ubu, but in all honesty, my initial reaction to hearing New Picnic Time was “What is this garbage??” and I quickly turned it off.

Anyway, Yoko Ono is the better answer. I don’t expect people to love her wildest music, but the disdain people show toward this woman is through the roof. Even among hipsters who like out-there underground sounds, people act like she was just a joke. The subtext of racism and sexism is often a real possibility. And it feels extra unjust because a fair amount of her songs are infused with real pain, for instance the song mourning her miscarried child. And to have that honest expression mocked as some “emperor’s new clothes” trick just gets my goat. Ono you are not coming for my queen!

(though my getting into Pere Ubu and CAN first probably helped me get her music quite a bit)

3. Sports Entrance Theme:

How bout I shift to professional wrestling instead? I don’t care for sports, but I was at least really into WWF as a kid.  

If I were playing a heel, I would use “Clubbed to Death” by Rob Dougan. Maybe I’m just saying that because I walked a runway to that song for a hair show. Man, am I not into sports!

4. Life Soundtrack Song:

It’s not as dramatic or powerful as your memory, but it’s been in my mind lately:

When Joe Biden was inaugurated Jan 20, 2021, I played “This Little Light of Mine” by Odetta, and I broke down crying. It just perfectly summed up my feelings: a ray of hope enduring against a flood of weariness and despair.

Let’s all make sure our light shines bright throughout these next few years.

JJ Live At Leeds
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February 12, 2024 9:28 am

1. I was really into indie / alternative in high school. Which led to a fair amount of derision from my fellow pupils who were largely a conservative lot. I read the weekly music papers, I’d heard a few songs and knew Oasis were coming before they’d released a single and that they would be big. At the time their brashness and unrefined attitude was new and refreshing. As is the way, I got mocked for my new found musical passion. Then Britpop happened, the alternative became the mainstream and a couple of years later the same people that had laughed and said ‘Who the f*** are Oasis?’ were now telling me how they’d always been fans.

2. I’m usually not that precious about music. Not now anyway. My pet hate is more when people don’t have an understanding that music (or any cultural activity) is subjective and can’t get their heads round the fact that other people don’t defer to their opinion.

That being said, Dexy’s Midnight Runners had a decent run of hits here, two #1 singles but Come On Eileen still overshadows everything else. They’re seen as a bit of a novelty because of the denim dungaree clad image they had at that time and preferring fiddles over guitars. Which totally overlooks that Kevin Rowlands poured his whole soul into it and the lyrics were so intense its almost hurts and that Come On Eileen and the whole album is a heartbreaking work of staggering genius.

3. As I walk out to bat (cricket of course) I’ll be accompanied by Air: Sexy Boy. I can dream right?! Gotta project an air of confidence before hitting them for six. It’s quite a walk to the middle of a cricket pitch so it allows plenty of time to take in the music.

4. An important moment? No. Inconsequential but memorable moments? Yes.
Having finished university with no clue what to do I drifted into a job thru a temping agency in the mail room of a large multinational company. Turned out there were plenty others like me. It was like a continuation of bring at uni, we still had no responsibility being on temporary contracts and doing the most menial brainless work but it gave us a bit of money and we’d chat our way through the day. And when we finished work at 10pm it was straight to a bar every night and sometimes onto a club. One night we’d gone onto the cheesiest club in town, mainstream pop and cheap drinks. They finished the night at 2am with Robbie Williams; Angels. There was a big group of us, male and female, in a huddle, arms round each other on the dance floor belting it out. We might have been in a dead end job and we might not have been Robbie fans but we were young, drunk and everything felt possible

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February 12, 2024 1:32 pm

I don’t know Dexy’s Midnight Runners all that well but you can’t dismiss “Come on Eileen” as a novelty. Sure, it’s exhilarating but those lyrics are hard-hitting: “These people ’round here/ Were beaten down, eyes sunk in smoke-dried face/ They’re so resigned to what their fate is/ But not us (no never)/ We are far too young and clever.” That’s incredibly bittersweet. These are young people who won’t really understand how precious their youth is until they get older and resigned to their fate, and I respect any songwriter who can evoke that.

Pauly Steyreen
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February 12, 2024 4:53 pm

Sexy Boy! That’s classic.

Reminds me of this High Fidelity quote from Rob, talking about what songs he would want played at his funeral:

I’ve always had this fantasy that some beautiful, tearful woman would insist on “You’re the Best Thing That Ever Happened to Me” by Gladys Knight

mjevon6296
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February 12, 2024 5:51 pm

I just “discovered” Air and Moon Safari about a year ago and love it! (I am way behind on life in general) It gets played and always enjoyed about once a week

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February 14, 2024 4:56 pm

“All in All(This Last One Wild Waltz)” and “Old” are indeed “a heartbreaking work of staggering genius”. I’ve agreed with you on this point before.

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February 12, 2024 11:24 am

I can not begin to answer these questions in less than a 400 page book, so I’ll give an explanation for each instead:

  1. I’m…pretty good at remembering things. I can still tell you all the teachers I’ve ever had, my class schedule grades 7-12, almost every girl I’ve ever dated, and so on…and most of these events have a soundtrack. I used to keep a blog about 18 years ago, and weekly I would pick a random week from the 80s and list the Billboard Top 40 from that week. I’d highlight them different colors: those I’d owned, knew, or couldn’t remember (few and far between), then I’d share a story about them, usually something from my life. I’ve wanted to share one of those lists here on TNOCS, so I might go back and revisit sometime.
  2. I’m never offended by someone who doesn’t “get” my music, but I do get offended when someone has no interest in listening/learning new music. That brings me back to when I shared Steve Miller’s “Abracadabra” with my father and he told me that hadn’t been any good music since 1964. Mind you, he and my stepmother fell in love with The Cranberries, so there’s that…more likely, I’ll offend someone with my dislike of Rush, The Grateful Dead, and country music. Sorry/not sorry.
  3. Because I really, REALLY enjoy the endorphins/adrenaline from discovering new music, I’d probably request a different song every week, something that gets me going. Here’s a good example of a song in my heavy rotation right now:
  4. Same answer as #1, but much, MUCH more extensive.

https://youtu.be/MWLpR6Fsc6Q?si=H67EUzyDpLnF9Zzp

lovethisconcept
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February 12, 2024 12:19 pm
Reply to  rollerboogie

I can definitely hear both of those.

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February 12, 2024 11:35 am

For #1, I don’t mean to be difficult: But I have to break it down to four answers.

Freshman year:
There was an unspoken secret club, for which the qualification and initiation rite had to be executed, but it was never spoken of:
You had to be able to flawlessly sing every word of “American Pie,” in order to properly impress the girls.

Sophomore year:
We skipped school that year for a total of 26 non-consecutive days and went to Steve’s house, because both of his parents worked. We played Close To The Edge and Dark Side Of The Moon on his audiophile father’s stereo all day long, and practiced explaining their deep meanings and messages, in order to properly impress the girls.

Junior year:
Not exactly a rabid fan of AB𐐒A, Paper Lace, or First Class. But I dutifully went along and smiled whenever “Waterloo,” The Night Chicago Died, and “Beach Baby” came on the radio, in order to properly impress the girls.

Senior year: Alison (with one “L”) broke my heart in seventeen places while “Love Will Keep Us Together” was playing on the radio in the Arby’s parking lot.

It was then that I learned that I needed to do a much better job of impressing the girls.

JJ Live At Leeds
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February 12, 2024 12:57 pm
Reply to  mt58

Can you still flawlessly sing every word of American Pie? And was this the full 8 minute version not just a single edit?

I’m just glad that wasn’t the initiation rite to join tnocs.

Last edited 8 days ago by JJ Live At Leeds
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February 12, 2024 1:14 pm

I absolutely can.

Edit: And, surely you jest: of course, the entire full length version. (See also: the whole honkin’ 12″ version of “Rappers Delight.” But I digress.)

And our initiation here is a little less stringent:

“Can you click a green thumb?”
“Congratulations, you’re a member!”

Phylum of Alexandria
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February 12, 2024 1:12 pm
Reply to  rollerboogie

Or “Alison.”

mt58
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February 12, 2024 1:18 pm
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Well, as it turns out, hers was not.

It’s been 49 years. I’m fine. I hardly ever think about it more than a couple of times a week.

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February 12, 2024 3:26 pm
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February 13, 2024 10:44 am
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I remember this comment. I was invested that day. Because for me that song is a 10, but Tom admitted he was clueless as to why anybody could like that song.

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February 12, 2024 1:40 pm
  1. In high school, my friends and I were very into They Might Be Giants and I wore out a tape I dubbed of their first two albums and the early EPs.
  2. I’d say if anybody couldn’t appreciate Prince’s genius, it would not quite offend me but I just wouldn’t understand them. We would just be speaking two different languages. This is mostly moot, since you don’t hear too many people just dismissing Prince out of hand.
  3. “Hold My Hand” by UNKLE. It would have to be timed just right so you could get the full effect of the intro and the part where it starts getting really heavy.
  4. At our wedding, the DJ played “Intergalactic” by the Beastie Boys (one of our required songs) and everybody danced. It went over so well that he played it twice and people kept dancing. This was all our friends packing the dance floor to a song that soundtracked our late ’90s.
ThinkMusicPhilly
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February 12, 2024 3:11 pm

1. Senior year, 1999. I was pretty big into, not sure what to call it, light industrial(?) along the lines of Gravity Kills, so I was psyched to see Stabbing Westward play. My friend was more excited to see the co-headliner Placebo. Prick (the band) opens the show at the Electric Factory to shrugs. Placebo was supposed to play next, but got delayed on the drive there. SW plays, and they were underwhelming. We were about to leave, but there were signs on the exit doors that Placebo had arrived and were going to play. Three quarters of the crowd ignored it and left. Then the three guys from Placebo just blew the rest of us away. I think I only knew Pure Morning at that point (and maybe Every You Every Me from Cruel Intentions, but I don’t know if I had seen that yet). Their fast, almost punk energy totally surprised me, and I was immediately converted to a fan for life.

2. Can’t think of one, really. Maybe Bowie? I know my tastes are my tastes alone. I am (mostly) fine with whatever others like.

3. My first few thoughts were all a little dark for this assignment (1849 by One Minute Silence, The Height of Callousness by Spineshank, and After The Eulogy by Boysetsfire). Let’s go with Bro Hymn by Pennywise which used to be the goal song for the Philadelphia Flyers.

4. Everyone has shared some really personal and pivotal stories for this one. This is neither of those. By myself, sophomore or junior year of high school, playing Tomb Raider on my computer, listening to a Downset cassette my cousin had given me. Lara Croft is shooting a dinosaur(? Don’t remember that detail), and the gunshots and the target falling exactly sync up to the “boom..boom..boom..down” coming out of the intro to Anger. Will never forget it.

https://youtu.be/ArHS3gadrQs?si=idQfog2jP_U7bRWX

Pauly Steyreen
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February 12, 2024 5:06 pm

These are some great prompts!

  1. My freshman year, nothing on earth could top the glory of Queensryche’s Operation: Mindcrime album. I can still sing the entire album from memory. One afternoon, a girl in the neighborhood and another friend stopped by my house. My friend and I mostly liked the same music, but the girl did not. I was lip syncing very passionately to one of the Queensryche songs, and she was like, “Pauly, you take your music too seriously…”
  2. My musical obsessions change regularly, but whenever I’m in the midst of an obsession, I do not brook any criticism of the artist(s) in question. My senior year in high school, I got sent to the principal’s office for flipping off a girl who made fun of Jane’s Addiction. Now of course, say what you want about Jane’s and I won’t bat an eye. But if at this moment you’re considering talking shit about The Beths, Beach Bunny, Alvvays or Carly Rae Jepson, wait until I leave the room please.
  3. I have thought about this one, and I have a definite answer: the opening to “Race for the Prize” by Flaming Lips.
  4. The first song I remember my son loving and singing (when he was like 4 years old) was “Walking on a Dream” by Empire of the Sun. Thinking about him singing the song brings me such a hit of tender nostalgia.

https://youtu.be/eimgRedLkkU?si=G8hXZvrIgIxuQeH2

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February 12, 2024 5:44 pm

First, thanks Roller for this column and several of the previous ones – I am still enjoying the Harpsichord playlist and listening to Graham Day & The Gaolers and Fischerspooner. (The Graham Day album reminds me of the Little Steven’s Underground Garage – The Coolest Songs in the World records!)

I am going with the first thing that popped into my head (and before reading other’s comments.)

1.I remembered being a high school senior and after a basketball pep rally where we were let out of school at the end, someone played ABC’s “Be Near Me” in our ancient gym and it sounded so good echoing off the walls. I remember lingering and talking to other students. It had taken me that long in my life to start feeling confident in myself and learn how to be social so I always have a good feeling when I hear that song!

2.I had often discussed classic rock with a good work friend of mine for several years before I moved to another city 11 years ago. (We saw Rush twice together as well as Crosby, Stills, and Nash!) I love the group Fleet Foxes (folk rock harmony) and let my friend borrow my CD copy of Helplessness Blues and figured he would love it as much as I did. He did not and said it all kinda sounded the same. That hurt my pride for a while but I had to finally say to myself that it was his loss. We still work together on-line – just not in the same city – and he is still my friend.

3.I have always thought I would walk up to bat for the Texas Rangers to the sound of The White Stripes’ Black Math. It is a “stomper” that would get me hyped up and maybe the crowd would clap to it too.

4.Again, I thought of this before reading the comments but did not write it until after reading the comments. I thought of my mom in hospice seven years ago. I stayed with my step-father (her husband) and was the night-time family person that stayed with her overnight at the hospice facility. In the morning, my step-father and uncle would arrive and I would go to my step-father’s house to either sleep a little more or remotely get a few hours of work done before it was my time to go back. For some reason, I latched onto Robbie Williams’ album The Eagle Has Landed during that time and would listen to it once during the day while working and once at night when with my mom. (The album was not new to me but it was the comfort I needed at that time.) I saw JJ’s comment and had also focused on Angels as the song I remember most during that time.

Last edited 8 days ago by mjevon6296
mt58
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February 12, 2024 11:00 pm
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10,000 points for Fleet Foxes.

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February 12, 2024 5:46 pm

Hummmm, not sure I have solid answers for all four, but I’ll give it a shot.

  1. My main HS musical memory is that i was out of touch with most of my classmates tastes. While I was a teen during the 70s, I was mostly not a fan of the most popular genres of the era: hated disco, wasn’t into hard rock of metal, same for prog, and didn’t particularly like Southern Rock, which was environmental in small town Georgia. I did like early 70s soul and R&B, buit that was not as popular with my peers. My tastes were heavily shaped by my much older brother, who plugged me into all of the 60s sounds through forced watching of “Where the Action Is” and similar shows and his constant playing of radio. I was overjoyed when punk and post-punk hit, since, to me, it had the feel of a lot of 60s rock-n-roll.
  2. The musical hill I’d die on? This is a tough one, since I don’t really want to die, but when people dismiss the Beatles because they were “just a boy band” or because they were popular I do get annoyed. It makes me suspect that they’ve never really given a listen, and also don’t really understand the journey the Beatles took us on. But that’s ok, they can be wrong,
  3. Never really thought of this one before, but the very first thing that came to my mind: https://youtu.be/VJzXCdXXiA4?si=E6F996yTb7_r_lIa
  4. I think I’d have to say that mostly I’m disappointed that life isn’t scored with appropriate musical cues and songs to help us understand the moment we’re in. So, it’s the absence of that soundtrack that resonates.
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February 12, 2024 8:23 pm
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The fact that your peers weren’t into R&B is disappointing, considering the most important rock-era act from small-town Georgia is the Famous Flames.

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February 13, 2024 9:29 am
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Peer pressure, I guess. Georgia has a rich history in soul and early rock-n-roll: JB, Little Richard, Otis Redding, Ray Charles. My brother saw all of them live in the 60s.

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February 13, 2024 9:29 am
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Dang, I left out Gladys Knight and the Pips.

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February 12, 2024 11:04 pm
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Hmmm…

beatles-vs-the-four-seasons
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February 12, 2024 6:08 pm

1.      High School – I remember having a discussion (I’d call it an argument except we all agreed) in first period one day with one of my friends and one of her friends, where we were all complaining about MTV and how they didn’t play good music, by which I meant they didn’t play women, Black people or dance music unless they were incredibly popular or had huge hits (Madonna, Michael Jackson, Rick Astley), and they meant MTV didn’t play real metal music. We all agreed they needed to play more variety, even if we didn’t care for each other’s musical tastes.

2.      Album/artist someone is critical of and those are fighting words – Abba and by extension Eurovision. Calling Abba “disco” because of “Dancing Queen” (one of the greatest songs of all time) is incredibly reductive (and I like disco). The amount of talent in that group is insane, from the complex instrumental arrangements to the dramatic storytelling lyrics written in English by two guys for whom English is not their first language, to the two principal singers with such unique, interesting voices that I’ve never heard the like of or any singer who sounds similar. That they hit it big but are dismissed because of Eurovision, an incredibly misunderstood SONGWRITER contest, furthers my anger at anyone who dismisses them, which used to be most of the world. It was lonely being an American Abba fan in the 90’s. Now we are everywhere.

3.      Baseball walk-on song – “It’s Raining Men” preferably the original by the Weather Girls, but it can also be the remake by Martha Wash & RuPaul. If I’m a professional baseball or cricket player, it means I’m the only out gay one and I’m rubbing that in everyone’s faces. Suck it, right- wingers and bigots!

4.      Song that soundtracked an important moment of my life – “TVの国からキラキラ”by 松本伊代 (“Terebi no Kuni kara KiraKira” by Iyo Matsumoto). In 1982, my family moved for a year to Japan. I was ten and it turned out to be probably the most formative year of my life. I was able to walk everywhere on my own, as Japanese children did, gaining a level of independence I’d never experienced before. My Mom would send me out to do the grocery shopping, giving me a list and 10,000 yen, knowing I was responsible enough to get everything and return the change. Going to the video arcades and playing games we’d never seen before that wouldn’t show up in America until after we had returned. Same for toys. I had transformers and handheld video games years before they appeared in America. I learned all about war and the horrors of nuclear weapons since Peace Park in Hiroshima was a block from our home and I walked through it multiple times a week. My family were special guests at the memorial service for the A-bomb victims that year. And I first really started getting into music, a lifelong passion. We listened to AT40 because we watched/listened to anything in English. But I was enchanted by the two Japanese top ten shows that aired on TV every week, playing the top ten J-pop songs as voted by viewers. Think “Solid Gold” without dancers and the singers/bands performing their hits live every week. And my favorite was “TVの国からキラキラ”by 松本伊代 (“Terebi no Kuni kara KiraKira” by Iyo Matsumoto). Roughly translated, it means “The ‘shiny sparkly’ country from TV”. It spent one week at number ten on both shows, but I was in the habit of recording all the songs that entered the top ten and listening to them over and over. And that was my favorite at the time. It’s no longer my favorite J-pop song from 1982 or my favorite song by Matsumoto Iyo, but it still holds a very special place for me of a time that changed me forever. In November, I will return to Japan for the third time, this time on a specifically gay tour. I hope we go to karaoke and I hope they have TVの国からキラキラ for me to sing. 

Phylum of Alexandria
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February 13, 2024 1:05 pm
Reply to  danieruw

I think I would translate that title (its gist at least) to something like “Razzle Dazzle From TV Land.” Or, if that sounds more snarky than sparkly, maybe “Glitz and Glamor From TV Land.”

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February 13, 2024 10:58 am

High School-My group of close friends obsessed over Genesis’ Invisible Touch album. I think we all liked older Genesis albums better, but IT was out at the time, and we had fun being silly fans. We went to see them live that year, too. To this day any of us at any time can text one another a joke about Genesis.

Defensive music – This is a tough one, because I really love to defend underdog genres like country and easy-listening. But I probably defend 70s pop music with the most gusto. The likes of Neil Sedaka, Captain and Tennille, The Carpenters, bread, etc…are the most fun to defend, since folks love to trash on them so casually.

Walk on music – I think about this ALL THE TIME. And I have come up with so many answers over the years. Would it be ironically humorous, like “Theme from a Summer Place” by Percy Faith? More likely I would choose something peppy and fun from the 70s, like “TSOP” or “Pick Up the Pieces” or “Frankenstein”.

Songs tracking important moments of my life – so, so many. Sad ones, happy ones, incidental ones. Maybe my favorite was meeting a coworker at my first real job. He was a solid 25 years older than me. But we were both music nerds and chart nerds! In an early conversation, we connected on an obscure 1960 single I brought up, “Don’t You Just Know It” by The Fendermen. But then we both got so excited, because we both knew that the B-side, an instrumental called “Beach Party” was even better! Fantastic moment of connection for us.

Last edited 7 days ago by LinkCrawford
Pauly Steyreen
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February 13, 2024 11:15 am
Reply to  LinkCrawford

TL;DR — LinkCrawford defends bread, surprising no one.

I also LOVE that you would choose “Theme from a Summer Place” as your walk-up music. Seriously Link, you are secretly a superhero and you haven’t even realized it yet (or admitted it to us).

LinkCrawford
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LinkCrawford
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February 13, 2024 11:18 am
Reply to  Pauly Steyreen

 😆 
I hope I can fly. That would be cool.

cappiethedog
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February 14, 2024 5:03 pm
Reply to  LinkCrawford

I liked The Fendermen version of “Don’t You Just Know It”.

cappiethedog
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February 14, 2024 4:54 pm
  1. Being known as the guy who think Bob Marley is just all right.
  2. I like Billy Joel. But still, I can laugh when somebody wrote that he sounds like a “dying walrus”, because I don’t think that’s necessarily a bad thing.
  3. “Numbers” by Kraftwerk.
  4. My mother’s side of the family fractured after the matriarch passed away. My mom and I wanted to keep the house in the family. And that meant selling it to my cousin before market value. We were outvoted. Even though, I was the primary caretaker. Adding insult to injury, I also lost control of the memorial video. My uncle chose Andy Williams’ “The Days of Wine and Roses”. The song didn’t signify my grandmother. I got through the funeral mostly intact.
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